Tender Is the Flesh Review

Tender Is the Flesh Review

Kindle Edition, 224 pages

Published August 4th 2020 (first published November 29th 2017)


A 5 star read

My summary: 

Imagine a day when we can no longer eat meat from animals, because they are infected with a virus that could potentially kill us. In response to that the government makes cannibalism legal! And yes, now we got breeding facilities and slaughterhouses for “special meat”. Sounds insane, right? Well, enter the world of Tender is the Flesh and you get exactly that.

Marco works at a processing plant in order to afford the care his sick father needs. He might hate his work, as would most people, but he knows what he has to do. He has learned how to detach himself from his work, and no longer sees “the meat” as human. That is until he is given his own female specimen, and within a short while he realizes she is an awful lot like him. A normal human being. 


My review:

I feel like I should start my review with how repulsive and gross this book is. But honestly, it wasn’t to me. It makes me feel a bit odd how much I actually enjoyed this book. You’re probably thinking how can she enjoy a book about butchering and eating humans? Well, it might be about that on the surface, but if we dive deeper we get a whole other story.

This isn’t just a book about cannibalism. It’s also a book about losing the ones you love, and trying to live your life after.  It’s a book about the government, and how dangerous it is to blindly trust it. It is about the animals we take for granted and abuse. There is so much packed into these 224 pages, it’s hard to summarize it all.

One point I might add, I could’ve gone without the scene with the puppies. I know it sounds odd to complain about that after just saying I enjoyed a book about eating people, but well I’m a huge animal lover, so there it is. 

And yes, it is gross. Revolting at times. But I still loved it in all its weirdness.

Screens Review

Screens Review

Paperback, 321 pages

Expected publication: January 26th 2021 by Garden Path


A 4 star read

My summary: 

A mysterious group called “The Network”, has been solely responsible for the distribution for “The Manuscript”. Only those who have read it know what exactly it is, and in most cases they end up disappearing or murdered. There is no trace of it on the internet, and all information is passed around on handwritten notes.

Participants of the Network also have sworn of all technology. They do not use phones, computers or the internet. They are convinced that something terrible is trying to reach our world through screens. And THEY are always watching…


My review:

Reading just the summary of the book, I wasn’t prepared for what was about to unfold on my Kindle. Screens is so much more than just a story about a mysterious manuscript. In fact, Christopher Laine has built an entire world within 300+ pages, that not only includes our reality, but others as well.

Without giving away the plot, I will try to rehash some of the parts of this book. We got some time traveling, cosmic horror, the terrors of drug addiction, and conspiracy theories all in one. There certainly is a lot going on here. But it all works perfectly together, even if it did get a bit confusing at times. I did find the book to be hard to follow at times, but it all worked out in the end and I understood what was happening. Overall, a good novel that I would definitely recommend.

Thanks to Netgalley and Garden Path for the arc.

The Hobgoblin of Little Minds Review

The Hobgoblin of Little Minds Review

Kindle Edition, 249 pages

Expected publication: February 18th 2021 by Wicked Run Press


A 5 star read

★★★★★

The Hobgoblin of Little Minds is the story of Kori, who has been suffering through her dad’s mental illness for most of her life. He was in and out of hospitals, and his mood was unpredictable and changed in a matter of minutes. The last time she saw him was in a psychiatric hospital. The same hospital that is now closed and about to be torn down. Kori has been haunting the hospital halls for years, looking for answers and her father. Once she finds him it becomes clear that what lives in this empty building is no longer her beloved dad at all.

Looking at the cover of The Hobgoblin of Little Minds, you might expect a good ole’ werewolf horror story. Like myself, you might also not be a big fan of the werewolf trope. Well, let me assure you this book is so much more than that. What Matthews did here is amazing and deserves a much better review than I will ever be able to give. He combines the supernatural with the world of mental illness, and does a phenomenal job at that.

Now, there are still a lot of horror elements in the book. The creatures are creepy and gruesome. But at the essence, they are broken human beings that have been let down by the people they trusted the most to help them. 

Mark Matthews truly is a special gem, and I look forward to reading a lot more of his works to come.

A big thanks to Wicked Run Press and Netgalley for the advanced copy. 

The Rotting Within Review

The Rotting Within Review

Paperback, 202 pages

Published December 18th 2020 by Grindhouse Press


A 5 star read

Kenzie and her two children find themselves seeking refuge at her estranged grandmother’s bed and breakfast. She has never met the woman, but it is the perfect opportunity to escape her abusive boyfriend. Her grandmother, Shirley, seems like a kind and caring person and takes the three of them in with open arms. She only has one rule for the trio; they are supposed to stay away from the third floor at all times. A pair of reclusive old women have been living on said floor for over three decades.

A few weeks into their stay, Shirley has to suddenly leave the bed and breakfast and leaves Kenzie in charge. To make matters worse, the kids get sick and Kenzie finds herself alone. Yet, that isn’t the worst thing that is about to happen in the house.

The Rotting Within is a fantastic book filled with action, suspense, terror and everything a horror book should entail. I am so glad I got a chance to read it as my first book for 2021. It surely made the start of a new year more enjoyable. Matt Kurtz has a unique talent for keeping his readers engaged and describing his visions perfectly. I didn’t feel like I was merely reading a book, but I was also living the book.

And let’s talk about the ending. It was so unexpected, I found myself holding my breath for the last few pages. This book truly went out with a bang!

I am definitely keeping an eye on Kurtz’s future works.

Thanks to the author for the review copy!

The Gulp Review

The Gulp Review

Kindle Edition

Expected publication: January 12th 2021


A 5 star read

I usually start my reviews with a summary, but I’m going to dive straight into my review of “The Gulp” instead. I really don’t want to spoil anything.

“The Gulp” is the story of a small town in Australia invented by author Alan Baxter. The book contains five stories about the “charming” place, and they all go hand in hand. Baxter did an excellent job setting the tone with the first story for  the collection, and plunges us into further madness and plain weirdness with each subsequent story. Just like the protagonist in the first story, we are new arrivals to Gulpepper and know nothing about it. When we slowly get to meet the other people calling it their home, we are given an insight into how off this place really is. Yet, nothing prepared me for the final story, which is so out there it followed me into my dreams last night! 

I have never read anything by Baxter, but he is an amazing story teller and I crave more of The Gulp. All of it’s odd freaky inhabitants, the violence, the mystery, just all of it.

Thanks to the author for the review copy!