The Haunting of Beatrix Greene Review

The Haunting of Beatrix Greene Review

Kindle Edition, 23 pages (this only counts the first episode)

Published August 7th 2020 by Serial Box


A 5 star read

My summary: 

Beatrix Greene, is a spiritual medium bringing comfort to the relatives of the deceased. With the help of her childhood friend Haz, she helps people contact their loved ones one last time. She doesn’t rely on gimmicks and parlor tricks, but knows that her powers aren’t real.

When a scientist comes to town, threatening to expose all mediums, she attends his lecture out of curiosity. Little does she know that this scientist was looking for her and needs her help in finding out if an old manor is haunted or not. Soon the two of them have to put their differences aside, or risk their lives. 


My review:

If you follow me on social media, you might know that Victorian England is my favorite time period. Mixing this period with ghosts, a creepy old manor and a gothic atmosphere makes for a book I can’t resist. 

The Haunting of Beatrix Greene is divided into “episodes”, and due to me receiving an advanced reader’s copy, I got them all at once. I really enjoyed reading it, and it was everything I had hoped for. It’s spooky, unsettling, and all the characters are great.

Now, there is also a fair amount of steamy romance, something I’m not always into. But, you can’t really have a historical horror book without some blushing ladies and handsome lords. So, I’m going to out myself here and say I truly enjoyed the romance. There, I said it. 

Overall, it’s a great read and highly recommended by me! 

Thanks to Netgalley and Serial Box for the arc.


The Gatherings Review

The Gatherings Review

Kindle Edition, First, 74 pages

 

Published August 7th 2020 by Infinite Ray Publishing

 


A 5 star read

My summary: 

Promoting global peace, celebrities and politicians are urging people to partake in so-called “Gatherings”, which sort of seem like hippie festivals; including hand holding, dancing, etc. All the Gatherings start at the same time no matter where you are in the world and all seem to be a way to show solidarity throughout human kind. Emily also attends one of these Gatherings with her friend, but she soon finds out it’s anything but a peaceful event. 

 


My review:

I loved the premise of this short story. I have to admit I’m kind of tired of apocalyptic stories as a whole, but this one was a completely fresh take on it. The way Emily tells this story is a lot of fun, as she keeps correcting herself and I’ve never seen this done in a book before. It seems extremely realistic, just as if I would write something down. 

 

The way the apocalypse starts is pretty gruesome and I enjoyed every second of it. As an introvert, I always knew it was best to stay alone and safe in my house. I could easily connect with Emily and her anxiety. That most of her story being told takes place in a branch of a tree is even more impressive. It just shows you don’t always have to have a ton of different settings to make a story interesting. I will definitely read more of Jeremy’s work in the future! 

 

Thanks to the author for the review copy!

 


 

The Haunting of Hacket House Review

The Haunting of Hacket House Review

Expected publication: October 23rd 2020


A 4 star read

My summary: 

Jane is a woman running from her past, which is why a well paid job at the mysterious Hacket House is perfect for her.  She leaves behind her previous work and becomes responsible for the dying Mr. Smithson. As soon as she arrives at the house she can tell things are odd. There are clocks all over the home and the other inhabitants of the estate are extremely peculiar. Then there are the strange residents of the village surrounding the house that act as if Jane is a meddlesome outsider.


My review:

Astrid Addams kindly asked me to review her upcoming novella The Haunting of Hacket House, and I immediately said yes, as I love creepy and mysterious houses as a horror trope. The author did an excellent job in setting the scene for the novella and sucking the reader in with a compelling prologue.

The protagonist, Jane, is a well developed character, whom it is easy to connect with. The other characters also make a nice addition to the already sinister plot. The story is  well written, and kept me engaged the entire time. 

Thanks to the author for the review copy. 




After Sundown Review

After Sundown Review

ebook, 304 pages

Expected publication: October 20th 2020 by Flame Tree Press


A 2.5 star read

My summary: 

After Sundown is the first issue of a planned annual collection of horror stories edited by Mark Morris and published by Flame Tree Press. It contains 20 stories, from some of the top authors in the horror genre.  


My review:

I have to start out by saying that I usually have no problem with anthologies. I know that the point of them is that all stories are unique and have nothing in common with each other. And I’m usually fine with that, but in this case it just didn’t work for me. 

I did like some of the stories and I will point them out in a minute, but I felt myself skimming through a lot of the shorts and just couldn’t stay interested. My favorite story out of them all was Swanskin (Alison Littlewood), closely followed by Butterfly Island (CJ Tudor), and finally The Importance of Oral Hygiene (Robert Shearman). The rest of them just didn’t impress me very much to be honest. 




Body of Christ Review

Body of Christ Review

Kindle Edition, 95 pages

Published January 8th 2018 by Wicked Run Press


A 4 star read

My summary: 

Body of Christ, is the story of a young boy named Keagan, who loses his father and has no help from his mother in coping with it. His mother is deeply religious, and only cares about her son becoming as religious as she is. Keagan has other plans, and builds his own Jesus out of his dead father’s flesh and communion wafers.

He also meets a girl named Faith, who buries her used menstrual pads in a memorial graveyard for aborted babies at the church. 


My review:

I just finished reading this book, and honestly I was gonna wait until tomorrow to write a review, but I have to get it out of my system. I’m not sure if Mark Matthews is religious or not, but holy cow! I have to give him kudos from having the guts to write this novella. There were at least three ( or more? I have no clue)taboo topics in it, and he sure as hell had no problem bringing them up- loudly!

Now, let me tell you, if you’re a Christian this novella will probably not be for you. I personally enjoyed it, even though it grossed me out and was really, really bizarre. I don’t know for sure what the underlying message in this book is (if there is one), but to me it portrayed the dangers of brainwashing and forcing children into religion. I might be wrong, but that’s my two cents.

To summarize it: If you’re squeamish, easily offended or disturbed you might not wanna read this one. 




Into The Forest And All The Way Through Review

Into The Forest And All The Way Through Review

Paperback

Published September 13th 2020


A 5 star read

My summary: 

Into The Forest And All The Way Through by Cynthia Pelayo is a haunting and brutal collection of over 100 poems. Each of these true crime poems tells the story of a missing or murdered woman in the United States. 


My review:

This book is a hard one for me to review. I have no experience with poetry whatsoever, especially not one with such a tragic theme. The poems are written beautifully, even if there is nothing beautiful in the topic matter. Cynthia Pelayo did an excellent job collecting these women’s stories and retelling them in her own way.

I felt so many different emotions while reading her collection. I was sad, angry and downright melancholic. This is not an easy topic to read about, but it never should be. These are real women who we are talking about and I’m outraged by each of their stories. I commend Cynthia for taking a stand for them and bringing them to our attention. 

A big thanks to Burial Day Books for the review copy.