The Lost Village Review

The Lost Village Review

ebook, 320 pages

Expected publication: March 23rd 2021 by Minotaur Books


A 3 star read

Alice Lindstedt has been obsessed with the story of an old abandoned mining town, also known as “The Lost Village”. Her grandmother’s entire family disappeared from it, along with everyone else in the village back in the 50s. Now, Alice is back to make a documentary about the place.

She is most interested in the baby that was found all by herself in the abandoned village 60 years prior. And also to find out the identity  of the woman that has been brutally murdered. Soon after arriving in the village with some friends, everything starts becoming weird. People go missing, and no one feels safe. 

My review:

I was really looking forward to reading “The Lost Village” by Camilla Sten. The premise sounded so promising, and I love a good abandoned town story. The writing was great, and the atmosphere portrayed by the author matched perfectly with the theme.

My main problem with the story was its characters. There was not a single person in the book that I liked or felt for. The protagonist Alice was tolerable at most. It’s hard to get invested in a book, if you can’t stand the people in it.

I would have rated it lower, if not for the ending. I really did not see that coming, and I enjoyed the twist. Some of the twists were not that surprising, but the ending itself was solid.

Thanks to Minotaur Books and Netgalley for the review copy.

The Savage Instinct Review

The Savage Instinct Review

Kindle Edition, 377 pages

Expected publication: March 16th 2021 by Inkshares (first published June 13th 2015)


A 5 star read

We first meet Clara Blackstone as she is on her way to live with her grandmother in India. The year is 1873, and Clara tells the reader the story of her life just months prior to her journey.

Clara’s husband Henry, had her committed to an asylum and she wanted nothing more than to return to her normal married life. But Henry moved to a new city during her incarceration and now wants her to join him in his new life. His new friends are nothing but judgmental about Clara’s behavior and expect her to be a better wife to Henry.

Clara soon makes an unexpected friend in a local female prisoner. A woman that is to stand trial for the murder of nearly twenty people, including her own children. She becomes a sort of confidante to Clara, who has to not only protect her own freedom now, but also her inheritance from her husband.

My review:

Have you ever read a book that made you really angry with the world? If not, then look no further than The Savage Instinct by M. M. DeLuca. There were times during reading that I had to put the book down and take a break. The way women are treated within these pages is utterly disgusting. They are lied to, mistreated and made into mindless arm candy for influential men. I applaud the author for making me feel this way, as we all know this used to be reality for many women. And it might not be too far fetched for our modern times either.

I adore the way DeLuca writes. Her writing flows and teleports the reader to another time. Her characters are either someone you will love or hate. Some of them I hated so much, I had to remind myself it was just a book. I truly felt for poor Clara and often wanted to reach through the pages and help the woman. I’ve seldom felt this invested in a book. 

Thanks to Inkshares and Netgalley for the review copy.

Alex Six Review

Alex Six Review

Kindle Edition

Published March 19th 2020


A 2 star read

My summary:

Alex is a rich heiress that truly has it all. Living in an apartment in a tower named after her family, she has all the money she could possibly ask for. After her husband’s tragic death, she is left with the wish to have a baby with him.

Luckily, she finds Vick who seems to be an exact doppelganger of her late husband. She uses her influence and wealth to pay him for sperm donations, in order to have a baby resembling her and her dead husband. But soon, Vick finds his marriage straining.

My review:

Alex Six has a great premise. I mean who doesn’t love a good stalker, especially one that is straight up crazy?  I see the majority of readers liked the book, but it really wasn’t for me. The book could’ve been a really great one, and I did like the twists and the ending.

What I did not love was the cheesy and quirky writing. The entire book was dripping in sarcasm and snark. I, myself, am a really sarcastic person, but this was way too over the top. Also, the word peasant is only funny so many times. 

Thank you so much to the author for this review copy. 

Your Turn to Suffer Review

Your Turn to Suffer Review

 


A 5 star read

My summary:

A sinister and otherworldly group by the name of The Cabal, is terrorizing Lorelai Palumbo. She has no real clue as to what she has done to deserve this. All The Cabal are telling her is that she has to atone and confess for her crimes, or she will suffer.

While Lorelai tries to figure out what she has done, The Cabal are busy destroying her entire life around her; her career, her family and her friends. No one is safe. Time soon seems to be running out for Lorelai, and she makes a desperate attempt to right her wrongs in The Cabal’s own world.


My review:

This is the second book I’ve read by Tim Waggoner, and also my second five star read by him. He is an extremely talented horror author, and his world building is simply “out of this world”. He has a real talent for seamlessly  mixing the real world with fantasy worlds. 

Waggoner’s writing is extremely dark, and absolutely no one is safe in this novel. It doesn’t matter whether a character is a child, an adult or an elder; everyone might suffer. I have to warn you: There is a specific part of the book that had me a bit shaken up. It involves children’s deaths, and that is something that really gets to me. So if  that makes you as uncomfortable as me, just be aware that stuff like this does happen in this book. Nevertheless, it does not change my opinion on this book. 

The last part I want to talk about is Lorelai herself. She is an amazing protagonist, and I took quite a liking to her. When the book was over, I was actually kind of sad that her and my story was over. But who knows, maybe I will find her on the Nightway one day!

A big thanks to Flame Tree Press and Netgalley for the arc. 

Midnight in the Chapel of Love Review

Midnight in the Chapel of Love Review

Publisher : JournalStone (January 29, 2021)

Language : English

Paperback : 224 pages


A 4 star read

My summary:

In 1964, a young couple went on a murdering spree after becoming convinced their love would last forever. They had taken and passed a test in the Chapel, an ancient and sacred place hidden on the outskirts of Waterwich. The Chapel is said to only work for lovers with a pure and true love for each other.

Fifteen years ago, Jonno meets the new girl in town. Her name is Jessica and her parents have sent her to live with her aunt in Waterwich. She is known for her morbid personality and reckless behavior. Jonno falls in love with her, and one night they also go looking for the Chapel.

In the present, Jonny Trotter has to return to Waterwich for his father’s funeral. He has tried to forget his tragic past for fifteen years now. But, some things never stay buried. 


My review:

Midnight in the Chapel of Love by Matthew R. Davis is a compelling mystery that will leave you feeling haunted long after you’ve finished it. Even though the story is written in two different timelines, he manages to keep everything clear and makes sure it all comes together in the end.

His characters are (mostly) likeable and well thought out. I especially enjoyed the friendship between Jonno and his two best friends. A friendship that truly endured the test of time.

The whole Chapel concept was a very unique and thrilling idea, and Davis’ description was very detailed. I almost felt like I had stepped into the Chapel myself. Davis also truly knows how to portray emotions. It wasn’t hard to comprehend Jonno’s feelings. The ending was especially raw and emotional, and left me with goosebumps and almost (!!) teary eyed!

Thank you so much to the author for this review copy.

Tender Is the Flesh Review

Tender Is the Flesh Review

Kindle Edition, 224 pages

Published August 4th 2020 (first published November 29th 2017)


A 5 star read

My summary: 

Imagine a day when we can no longer eat meat from animals, because they are infected with a virus that could potentially kill us. In response to that the government makes cannibalism legal! And yes, now we got breeding facilities and slaughterhouses for “special meat”. Sounds insane, right? Well, enter the world of Tender is the Flesh and you get exactly that.

Marco works at a processing plant in order to afford the care his sick father needs. He might hate his work, as would most people, but he knows what he has to do. He has learned how to detach himself from his work, and no longer sees “the meat” as human. That is until he is given his own female specimen, and within a short while he realizes she is an awful lot like him. A normal human being. 


My review:

I feel like I should start my review with how repulsive and gross this book is. But honestly, it wasn’t to me. It makes me feel a bit odd how much I actually enjoyed this book. You’re probably thinking how can she enjoy a book about butchering and eating humans? Well, it might be about that on the surface, but if we dive deeper we get a whole other story.

This isn’t just a book about cannibalism. It’s also a book about losing the ones you love, and trying to live your life after.  It’s a book about the government, and how dangerous it is to blindly trust it. It is about the animals we take for granted and abuse. There is so much packed into these 224 pages, it’s hard to summarize it all.

One point I might add, I could’ve gone without the scene with the puppies. I know it sounds odd to complain about that after just saying I enjoyed a book about eating people, but well I’m a huge animal lover, so there it is. 

And yes, it is gross. Revolting at times. But I still loved it in all its weirdness.